BevMart supports the Responsible Service of Alcohol

Liquor licensing legislation in Australia is state and territory-based:

New South Wales: Liquor Act 2007: It is against the law to sell or supply alcohol to, or to obtain alcohol on behalf of, a person under the age of 18 years.

Victoria: Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence: To supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years (Penalty exceeds $19,000), For a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor (Penalty exceeds $800).

Western Australia: Liquor Control Act 1988: It is an offence to sell or supply liquor to a person under the age of 18 years on licensed or regulated premises; or for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase, or attempt to purchase, liquor on licensed or regulated premises.

South Australia: Liquor Licensing Act 1997, Section 113: Liquor must NOT be supplied to persons under 18.

Queensland: Liquor Act 1992: It is an offence to supply liquor to a person under the age of 18 years.


Australian Capital Territory: Under the Liquor Act 2010. A person must not sell or supply liquor to a person under 18 years old on premises where the sale or supply of liquor is authorised or in a public place. Maximum Penalty $5500.

Tasmania: Under the Liquor Licensing Act 1990 it is an offence: for liquor to be delivered to a person under the age of 18 years (Penalty: Fine not exceeding 20 penalty units); and, for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase liquor (Penalty: Fine not exceeding 10 penalty units).

Know your limits
Measuring spirit nips when pouring from a bottle is very important to drinking responsibly. A 30ml spirit nip (40% alc) is the equivalent of one standard drink and it is very easy to go over the standard drink limit if not using measures. If in doubt, please refer to the alcohol volume percentage on the label. If the alcohol volume varies, so will the standard drink measure so calculate your measures carefully.

Did this answer your question?