Districts need to send letters to families whenever students are excessively absent. To expedite this process in jmc Office, you can create a customized form letter to be sent to primary contacts when attendance issues get to the point that they warrant a note home. Learn how the attendance, discipline and form designer modules all work together to help improve overall communication between stakeholders within your district.

Form Designer

In the jmc Office menu tree under Form Designer > Student Info Forms you can create fully customizable attendance form letter templates which will merge live data when printed.

  • Use placeholders that will automatically fill student name, grade and other important demographic information.

  • Create an attendance letter and use it as a template.

  • Use the template to create multiple attendance letters for different types of attendance issues.

Attendance and Period Attendance Modules

In the jmc Office menu tree under Attendance > Reports > Form Letters, the attendance module works in conjunction with the custom form created in the form designer to automate the selection of families to receive a form letter and make record of the letter being sent.

  • Send customized letters to students that have reached user-defined absence thresholds.

  • Prevent multiple letters from being sent for the same instance.

  • Define thresholds for the instances an attendance letter should be sent (For example 5 days/instances, 8 days/instances, etc.)

  • Select ranges of students to run attendance reports for.

  • Print customized form letters to mail to families alerting them to the issue.

  • Create a corresponding discipline record.

Discipline Module

The Attendance module creates a corresponding discipline record in the jmc Office Discipline module so jmc Office users can track and report on the attendance event causing the form letter to be sent. Users can perform a variety of additional actions after the letter has been sent.

  • Assign additional disciplinary actions as needed.

  • Reference other discipline problem behaviors or actions attached to students.

  • Create records of discipline notices that were sent to families.

  • Run a variety of reports associated with attendance as a problem behavior.

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