This help centre article has been written for the Koru Kids nanny service


*Last updated - 29th November 2021*

Koru Kids have been keeping up to date with the latest Government guidance, we've spoken to a number of schools and to the NHS Test & Trace service. This article sets out our understanding of when you can and can't work together, and reminds you what you should do to work safely in the home.

This article covers:

✅ When nannies can continue to go to work

❌ When nannies can't go to work

🟠 Exceptions for those who are fully vaccinated

❓ Common questions like pay and shielding if vulnerable

✳️ Working safely in the home

Nannies can continue to go to work if...

Everyone in the household is well but certain members may be self-isolating, taking extra precautions or at home.

Examples where your nanny can continue to work:

  • Your child has been sent home due to staff shortages and they haven’t been told to self-isolate by the school

  • Someone else in the family’s household is in quarantine after returning from abroad, so long as they can self-isolate effectively from the rest of the household and nanny

  • Someone else in the nanny’s household is in quarantine after returning from abroad, so long as they can self-isolate effectively from the nanny

  • Someone else in the family’s household has been contacted by NHS Test & Trace (or if it’s another child, sent home and told to self-isolate by school), so long as they can self-isolate effectively from the rest of the household and nanny, and don’t develop symptoms

  • Anyone in the family’s household who thinks they’ve been in contact with someone with symptoms or who has tested positive, but who has NOT been contacted by NHS Test & Trace (or school if it’s a child), so long as they don’t develop symptoms

  • The nanny thinks they’ve been in contact with someone with symptoms or who has tested positive, but they have NOT been contacted by NHS Test & Trace, so long as they don’t develop symptoms

Someone in either household has been identified as a contact by NHS Test and Trace or the NHS COVID-19 app, but they are either fully vaccinated* or under 18 years and 6 months.


*You are considered "fully vaccinated" 14 days after your final dose of an MHRA-approved vaccine that was administered in the United Kingdom. This is to allow for an antibody response to develop.

All contacts of suspected Omicron cases must self-isolate, regardless of their vaccination status. They will be contacted by NHS Test and Trace.


Nannies can't go to work if...

Either the nanny's or family's entire household is self-isolating.

Examples where your nanny can't go to work:

  • Your child has symptoms, has tested positive, has been told to self-isolate by school or NHS Test & Trace, or is in quarantine after returning from abroad

  • Your nanny has symptoms, has tested positive, has been told to self-isolate by NHS Test & Trace, or is in quarantine after returning from abroad

  • Your household is in quarantine after returning from abroad

  • Either household has entirely been told to self-isolate by NHS Test & Trace.

🟠 Nannies may be able to continue to work if...

Someone in either household is self-isolating but the Nanny is fully vaccinated.

  • Provided the person who is self-isolating can do so away from the rest of the household.

  • If someone in either household is self-isolating, you should discuss your options and use your own personal judgement to manage the risk of catching or spreading the virus.

Common Questions:

What if the area I live in is in a 5-week 'enhanced response' period?

There are no restrictions for childcare. This means nannies will be able to continue to provide services, including in the home.

In most cases, Local Authorities dealing with an enhanced response will be encouraging all adults to get vaccinated and take free Lateral Flow tests at least twice a week.

At 15th September non of the areas where Koru Kids operate are delivering an enhanced response.

What if the nanny is ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’?

If nannies are ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’, they are advised to follow the same guidance as everyone else. However, as someone who is at a higher risk of becoming seriously ill if they were to catch COVID-19, they should think particularly carefully about precautions they could take, which are detailed in the guidance for the clinically extremely vulnerable.

Does the nanny get paid if they can’t go to work?

If your nanny can’t go to work because your family’s household is self-isolating, you should continue to pay for your nanny's usual working hours.

Your nanny should not submit any shifts that they do not work. If you need to pay your nanny whilst you are self-isolating, please get in touch with our team. We will then add these hours as an adjustment to your nanny's pay.

If your nanny is self-isolating, then your nanny may be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay. If your nanny is not eligible, you may agree to continue paying for their usual working hours, although you are not obliged to. We strongly recommend you and your nanny discuss this as early as possible.

If your nanny should come to work but decides not to, they need to take this as unpaid leave.

✳️ Working safely in the home:

  • Regularly wash hands for at least 20 seconds, especially on arrival.

  • Regularly clean touched objects and surfaces, for example door handles, kitchen items and toys. Use normal household cleaning products.

  • Keep internal doors open where possible to minimise contact with surfaces and handles.

  • Maintain good ventilation, for example keep windows and doors open, or be outside where possible.

  • It is optional to wear a face covering while working as a nanny, but is it not required by law. The other measures mentioned above are the best ways to manage risk, and you should not rely upon wearing a face covering only.

For full advice on Coronavirus, click on the links below:

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